Ruger SR45

Discussion in 'Feedback Forum' started by randyj, Feb 7, 2017.

  1. randyj

    randyj Member

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    I have only ever had to send 3 firearms back for repair or replacement in close to 40 years of shooting....the only handgun was a Ruger SR45....I really liked the pistol, but it was FUBAR...on the very first magazine I shot through it, it broke....the mag release assembly broke and locked magazine in pistol.....6 rounds and it broke.....called ruger and sent it back....almost a month later I got it back with a sheet explaining parts replaced and test fired 50 rounds American Eagle, no malfunctions....took to the range and on the first magazine the slide did not lock back....ok, it is new....may need a few rounds through it.....shot 6 magazines and only once did slide lock back after last round shot....used both factory mags......but yet ruger said they fired 50 rounds through it with no malfunctions, sent it back to ruger again....2 weeks later I get it back with a big list of parts replaced and the same 50 round test with no malfunctions.....go back to range and on second mag slide fails to lock back....this tme it was about 50/50 on when it would lock back and when it would not....called ruger and told them what I thought of the product....sold pistol with issues to someone who liked challenges...lol
     
  2. dbcooper

    dbcooper Well-Known Member

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    I had one it was a solid gun but for some reason it just wasn't one of my favorite guns to shoot so it got sold and I took the money and added to it and bought a 1911
     
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  3. grcsat

    grcsat Well-Known Member

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    Warranty work is not what it once was. When I was doing warranty work you had to figure out the problem and follow though with the mechanical interaction of the parts. About half way though my short carear things started to change. I think Mossberg started the modular repair idea. One day you were taking a part the trigger assembly and the next day you were told there would be no trigger parts for warranty , but fully assembled trigger groups. Winchester came next with "don't replace springs in semi auto 22s replace entire bolt". this extended to all 22 bolts later on. So if you had a Model 60 that was jamming or not ejecting or not extracting, you replaced the entire bolt . I quess you could call it the shotgun approach.
    I f you had a Rem 700 with a trigger problem, you were not allowed to repair the trigger, you were told to replace it. By the time I left, Winchester had removed their barrel straightening vice and replaced it with a rifle rest and a sheet of paper stating what was and was not exeptable accuracy for a warranty claim.( no more center fire barrel replacements- send to factory) When it came to ammo, warranty normally paid for one full mag/clip per repair claim after repairs had been done. ( ammo used during the repairs/testing were exempt and paid for)
    Sometimes try as you may, you can't always find the problem with a rifle. I had a model 64B that no one could figure out why it was jamming. Every time it was thought to be fixed, it had a new problem. Winchester's solution was, keep the receiver and replace everything else. So that was what I did encludeing the stock. It worked after that and we never did know for sure what the problem was .
    That's how warranty worked back then.
    How warranty is handled today, I have no idea.
     
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  4. randyj

    randyj Member

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    I'm not sure it has not changed much.....build them like hell and hope for the best...I think they replace whole guns now more so than spending much time fixing a design flaw....they make design changes once the failing guns start coming back and keep pushing them out.....or they make a complete failure like the Remington r51 pistol a few years ago....I saw a new one lock up so tight on first round fired you could not have beat the slide back....saw a Taurus 9mm do the same thing one day at range, brand new gun, first shot locked it up and that was it....done...I see more total failures now than I ever have....
     
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  5. rawright54

    rawright54 Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    I guess the labor involved with diagnosing problems is more expensive than replacing whole assemblies. For warranty work, I can understand that. But we recently had a Remington come in that had a problem in the trigger group, and it wasn't a warranty issue - it was an older gun. Our gunsmith wouldn't tear down the trigger assembly - he just ordered a new one from Remington. His explanation was that Remington doesn't want us taking them apart. I call baloney!

    He's a great smith, in his way, an ex-army armorer, but he's never had a gunsmithing class in his life, entirely self-taught. I keep my mouth shut, since I was hired to sell guns, not fix them. But I have been trained thoroughly, and would not have hesitated to tear down that trigger group and find the problem. Parts are readily available. I guess I'm too old to appreciate the modern way of doing things...
     
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